Trends
Dec 4, 2015

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

By: Liz Guber

Author: Elle Canada

Trends
Dec 4, 2015

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

By: Liz Guber
 

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Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Velvet

Velvet is a woven fabric, and its luxurious texture is created by a pile of fibres cut to the same length – think of it like a wearable carpet. Some velvet can stretch thanks to added spandex fibres, however it should not be mistaken for its cousin velour, which stretches in all directions (that's why those Juicy Couture tracksuits were so comfy!).   READ MORE: 9 no-brainer items your work wardrobe needs

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Plaid

Plaid, also known as tartan, is made up of different coloured threads (usually wool, but sometimes synthetic material is also used) woven to create the signature check pattern. Plaid is often confused with flannel, but the check pattern of flannel is printed on, not woven in.   READ MORE: 50 pairs of winter boots that don't suck

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Neoprene

Made of rubber, neoprene has long been used in scuba gear thanks to its ability to stay flexible in a wide range of temperatures. The fashion world has also embraced its flexible, futuristic qualities. You'll find it used for bomber jackets, skirts, dresses and leggings.   READ MORE: How to properly raid your boyfriend's closet

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Denim

Here's a fun fact: Denim gets its name from the French city of Nîmes, where the fabric was first made. The term "jean" comes from the French pronunciation of Genoa, where the fabric was first turned into trousers. Denim is woven in a twill weave: a blue fibre passes over two white fibres to create the signature diagonal pattern. This weave is the reason your jeans are lighter colour on the inside. The weave also frays beautifully, explaining fashion's current obsession with this distressing technique.   READ MORE: 14 anything-but-boring ways to wear denim

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Tulle

Perhaps most famous for its use in ballet tutus, tulle is a fine netting that can be made from silk, nylon or rayon. Like denim, this fabric gets its name from the city where it originated (Tulle, France).   READ MORE: The bag that all the cool kids are wearing

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Satin

Satin is not a fabric, but a type of weave. Satin can be woven from a natural fibre like silk, or from a synthetic like polyester. Its glossy appearance is achieved by skipping 4 or more threads in the weaving process to achieve that smooth and silky look.   READ MORE: 13 bodysuits that will elevate your wardrobe

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Damask

Similar to plaid and houndstooth, true damask is woven, not printed. A damask weave uses two contrasting colours, and it dates back to the early Middle Ages.   READ MORE: The best things $50 will buy you right now

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Wool

You're likely familiar with wool. It comes from sheep, keeps you very warm and is sometimes itchy. Wool fibres are crimped – this gives them bulk when spun together, as well as the ability to retain heat well. Some of the most popular fabrics made from wool are crepe (a fabric that's textured thanks to the over-twisting of the wool fibre) and boiled wool (frequently used for coats and berets, the technique involves getting the wool fibres wet and then compressing them to create a felt-like textile).   READ MORE: Go from 9 to 5 in these slinky slips

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Intarsia

Intarsia knitting is a technique used to produce multi-coloured patterns and designs onto clothes. Unlike a regular knit, where two or more yarns are combined into one design, intarsia knits are made of separately knit pieces that fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. Argyle is one of the most popular patterns created using intarsia knitting.   READ MORE: Here's what your sweater says about you

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada

Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics

Your complete fabric vocabulary: Houndstooth

You know what houndstooth, the signature check weave from the Scottish lowlands, looks like. But did you know that a small houndstooth weave is also called a puppytooth? Cute!   READ MORE: 7 awesome outfits for every day of the week

By: Liz Guber Source: Imaxtree.com Credits: ELLE Canada
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Your cheat sheet to fashion's most popular fabrics