Visual Art Exhibitions to Check Out in Spring 2024

ENTIERRO EN EL MUSEO NACIONAL

ENTIERRO EN EL MUSEO NACIONALENTIERRO EN EL MUSEO NACIONAL (1991) BY BEATRIZ GONZÁLEZ; PHOTOGRAPHY, JULIO CÉSAR FLÓREZ

BEATRIZ GONZÁLEZ

Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo, Mexico City (until June 30, 2024)

Mexico City’s highly regarded Museo Universitario Arte Contemporáneo is showcasing the work of one of Latin America’s most influential living artists, Colombian-born Beatriz González, with a solo exhibition, War and Peace: A Poetics of Gesture. González, who was born in the 1930s, was an early adopter of appropriation, incorporating imagery from Western art, newspapers and magazines into brightly coloured flattened paintings of human figures. González is most famous for helping create a South American idiosyncratic version of pop art.

DECOLONISED STRUCTURES

DECOLONISED STRUCTURES DECOLONISED STRUCTURES (2022–23) BY YINKA SHONIBARE CBE; FIBREGLASS SCULPTURES HAND-PAINTED WITH DUTCH WAX PATTERN, GOLD LEAF AND WOODEN PLINTHS; COURTESY OF YINKA SHONIBARE AND GOODMAN GALLERY, CAPE TOWN, JOHANNESBURG, LONDON AND NEW YORK, JAMES COHAN GALLERY, NEW YORK, AND STEPHEN FRIEDMAN GALLERY, LONDON AND NEW YORK; PHOTOGRAPHY, STEPHEN WHITE & CO.

YINKA SHONIBARE

Serpentine, London, England (April 12 to September 1, 2024)

At London’s idyllic Serpentine galleries, British-Nigerian multidisciplinary artist Yinka Shonibare’s Suspended States delves deep into cultural identity and post-colonialism. He first came to prominence by creating traditional British Victorian clothing in brightly patterned African batik fabric and displaying it on groups of human forms in mid-action. His new work has the same fabric covering entire figures that mimic public statues of historical people that have become a source of much debate when it comes to whether they should still exist in urban public spaces.

 

UNTITLED

UNTITLEDUNTITLED (2013) BY RONI HORN; SOLID CAST GLASS WITH AS-CAST SURFACES AND OCULUS TOP (91.5 X 91.5 CM); COURTESY OF LOUISIANA MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

Roni Horn

Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebæk, Denmark (May 2 to September 1, 2024)

One of the few art institutions that offer a jetty from which swimmers can take a dip before or after a visit (especially if they enjoy a cold plunge), the Louisiana Museum is about 40 minutes outside of Copenhagen, on the shores of Øresund Sound. Louisiana sticks to presenting modern and contemporary masters, and its new exhibition by Roni Horn, The Detour of Identity, is a prime example. Horn is one of the most influential American artists of our time, and this is the first major solo presentation of her work in Northern Europe. Horn’s art practice encompasses photography, drawing and minimal large-scale coloured-glass sculptures. Within her work lies a cool sensuality and a rumination on the natural world’s forces of change and permanence.

I DO NOT OWN 4’33”

I DO NOT OWN 4’33”I DO NOT OWN 4’33” (2006) BY PIERRE HUYGHE; NEON INSTALLATION (320 X 289.6 CM); COURTESY OF REMAI MODERN MUSEUM; PHOTOGRAPHY, BLAINE CAMPBELL

Group Exhibition

Remai Modern Museum, Saskatoon (until September 22, 2024)

Other Arrangements: Poetics of the Performance Score at Saskatoon’s Remai Modern Museum is a novel look at performance art through the way artists script the instructions for creating the live actions of their art piece. Since such instructions are not standardized (like in music notation, for example), artists have created a wide range of written and pictorial maps to guide the performance of their work. This exhibition brings together leading figures in contemporary performance art, including Alaskan native Tanya Lukin Linklater, French-born Pierre Huyghe and Russian-Canadian Evgenia Mikhaylova. The museum’s grand piano will also be installed for the run of the exhibition so invited local artists can perform works by the late Canadian artist Rodney Graham and late avant-garde American composer George Brecht.

UKRAINIAN QUARTET – POWER PLANT

UKRAINIAN QUARTET – POWER PLANTUKRAINIAN QUARTET – POWER PLANT (2023) BY WANDA KOOP; COURTESY OF WANDA KOOP AND NIGHT GALLERY, © WANDA KOOP; PHOTOGRAPHY, WILLIAM EAKIN

Wanda Koop

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (until August 4, 2024)

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts presents Who Owns the Moon, the first solo show of world-renowned Winnipeg-based painter Wanda Koop. In this new body of work, Koop uses her Ukrainian roots as a point of departure and, in her signature smooth, light-touch application of high-key colours, works through the ongoing war in Ukraine and how the human memory processes experiences of loss, trauma and landscape

GLASS HAMMER

GLASS HAMMERGLASS HAMMER (1967) BY YOKO ONO; COURTESY OF LISSON GALLERY, LONDON; PHOTOGRAPHY, © CLAY PERRY

Yoko Ono

Tate Modern, London, England (until September 1, 2024)

Music of the Mind is a career-spanning retrospective of seven decades of conceptual art and music by Yoko Ono. Explore over 200 pieces of her most famous and daring works, including documentation of Cut Piece (1964), where the audience was invited to cut off her clothing, as well as music, installations, films and photographs, all beautifully presented in the expansive spaces of this famous British institution.

MORNING STUDIO

MORNING STUDIOMORNING STUDIO (2016) BY NICOLE EISENMAN; OIL ON CANVAS (167.6 X 210.8 CM); COURTESY OF THE HORT FAMILY COLLECTION; PHOTOGRAPHY, COURTESY OF NICOLE EISENMAN AND ANTON KERN GALLERY, NEW YORK

Nicole Eisenman

Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (until September 22, 2024)

The Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago is presenting its first major exhibition of French-born American artist Nicole Eisenman, whose wide-ranging art practice puts the human form in a central role through painting, drawing and sculpture. The grotesque humour of our bodily interactions and functions plays across work that references underground comics, history and 1930s socialist murals. Through all of her mediums, Eisenman’s wild, chaotic tableaux have so much to offer, with hidden details in every corner.

OVERBURDENED WITH SIGNIFICANCE

OVERBURDENED WITH SIGNIFICANCEOVERBURDENED WITH SIGNIFICANCE (2011) BY SIMONE LEIGH; PORCELAIN, TERRACOTTA AND GRAPHITE (55.9 X 20.3 X 25.6 CM); COURTESY OF BRIDGITT AND BRUCE EVANS, © SIMONE LEIGH; PHOTOGRAPHY, TIMOTHY SCHENCK

Simone Leigh

Los Angeles County Museum of Art & California African American Museum (May 26, 2024, to January 20, 2025)

Simone Leigh became the first African-American woman artist to represent the United States in the Venice Biennale in 2022 and is best known for large-scale sculptures of Black women that play with bodily proportions by incorporating large bell-like bases in clay, bronze and dried grass. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the California African American Museum will co-present a career-spanning survey of her ceramic, bronze, video and installation work, including pieces from the Biennale show.

INTERGALACTIC EMPOWERMENT WAMPUM BELT

INTERGALACTIC EMPOWERMENT WAMPUM BELTINTERGALACTIC EMPOWERMENT WAMPUM BELT (2019) BY SKAWENNATI; LEATHER, ARTIFICIAL SINEW, GLASS BEADS AND NAIL POLISH (13.7 X 75 X 0.5 CM); COURTESY OF NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA, OTTAWA, © SKAWENNATI; PHOTOGRAPHY, NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA

Group Exhibition

National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (May 17 to October 20, 2024)

Beading is one of the most common techniques in contemporary Indigenous art, and the crafting and use of beads goes back thousands of years in North America’s Indigenous communities. Radical Stitch , a group exhibition presented at our National Gallery and organized by the MacKenzie Art Gallery in Regina, showcases contemporary artists like Maria Hupfield, Skawennati and Nadia Myre, among many others, who demonstrate new and innovative ways of using the visual language of beads.

Read more:
Filipino Artist Sean Go Uses Bubblegum-Pop Muses to Create Surreal Paintings
12 South Asian Canadian Creators and Artists to Watch Right Now
8 Canadian Artists to Check Out This Fall