Health & Fitness
Dec 26, 2015

Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

By: Carli Whitwell

Getty Author: Elle Canada Credits: Getty

Health & Fitness
Dec 26, 2015

Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

By: Carli Whitwell

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Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

Why your New Year's resolution may be over-rated

Fitness goals will always get an #ELLEyeah! from us. But it turns out that January 1 — the day that about one-in-three Canadians say they’re going to start leading a healthier life — might not be the time to commit to running that marathon. Here’s why.   READ MORE: Must-have "green" beauty buys for the holidays

By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty Credits: ELLE Canada

Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

Why your New Year's resolution may be over-rated: You're procrastinating

Resolutions are another form of procrastination. “I’ll go to the gym once the holidays are over,” said every person ever. Why hold off? asks Timothy Pychyl, an associate psychology professor at Ottawa’s Carleton University. “Waiting until the new year shows a lack of commitment for change. It makes us feel very good to have a good intention for change; we can continue in our self-serving ways.”   READ MORE: 9 facts and fictions about cold and flu season you need to know now

By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty Credits: ELLE Canada

Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

Why your New Year's resolution may be over-rated: You'll probably bail

Way harsh, we know, but only about 8 percent of people follow through on resolutions. They are often too vague (“I wanna get in shape”) or too difficult (“I’m going to work out every day”).   READ MORE: 12 immune-boosting superfoods you need to add to your diet this winter

By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty Credits: ELLE Canada

Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated

Why your New Year's resolution may be over-rated: You may feel like a failure

Failure = shame spiral. “Failed resolutions can license bad behaviour with a sort of ‘What the hell effect’ where we give up,” says Pychyl. For example, he suggests, since we’ve blown our resolution to eat better, we might as well eat another piece of cake. If you slip up, make like Princess Elsa and let it go. “Our research shows that self-forgiveness is very important as it encourages us to try again,” he says.   READ MORE: How to avoid overeating at holiday parties

By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty Credits: ELLE Canada
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Why making New Year’s resolutions may be overrated