Health & Fitness

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Health & Fitness

We decode your best summer-workout plan

 

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We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Overachiever

My fitness personality is... I’m like Karlie Kloss: Always. At. It.   Gold stars for all that werk, werk, werk, werk, werk attitude. For your #summerbod, aim for 30 minutes of exercise five to six days a week, says personal trainer Brent Bishop of Toronto’s Think Fitness Studios.   READ MORE: Fitness battleground: the new generation of exercise classes will test your limits

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Overachiever

Your new rules: Switch it up.   If you’ve been doing the same step class since KUWTK first aired, retire those leg warmers. Repetitive movement can lead to injuries and progress plateaus. (The body adapts quickly to exercise.) Our pick: Fusion classes, such as piloxing (Pilates and boxing), which combine cardio and strength training so you can up your heart rate and burn fat in one session.   READ MORE: Why is everyone talking about LISS cardio and should you be doing it?

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Overachiever

Your new rules: Rest is sometimes best.   When you exercise, you make minuscule tears in muscles. If you don’t take a day off, your body won’t have a chance to repair the tissue, says Bishop, and that means your results won’t be as good. Also bad: When you’ve pulled five all-nighters in a row, your body hangs onto fat for energy. Allow yourself a day off from the late nights and the exercise.   READ MORE: Your guide to the best mother-daughter spa date ever

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Overachiever

Meal plan: Since your fitness game is on point, focus on nutrition.   The key to a healthy bod is 70-percent diet. Post-workout, make a smoothie with coconut water and a scoop of vegan protein — it’s a favourite of celebrity trainer Anna Kaiser. Protein helps to prevent the breakdown of muscles.   READ MORE: 5 things you need to know about souping

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Sometime Sweater

My fitness personality is... Fitness and I? We’re casual, like Bieber and Baldwin.   Time to commit. Healthy adults should be sweating it out for at least 2.5 hours a week, according to national guidelines. Build a program with cardio, strength training (builds muscle), interval training (bursts of activity followed by a rest) and stretching (for recovery).   READ MORE: Our health editor tests three new workouts

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Sometime Sweater

Your new rules: Stick with a workout for at least 15 minutes.   There’s an actual scientific reason why the start of a workout feels unbearable: It takes the body that long to adjust to the activity and elevate to its target heart rate (70 to 85 percent of the maximum heart rate). After that, you’re golden.   READ MORE: What is cloud bread and is it good for you?

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Sometime Sweater

Your new rules: Grab a partner in crunches.   Studies show that working out with a friend will make you more likely to (1) show up and (2) work harder. If workout buddies are scarce, meet WellSquad and Jaha. These apps are Tinder for your gym life; they link you up with fellow exercisers and trainers.   READ MORE: How to prevent burnout

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Sometime Sweater

Meal plan: Snack like you’re a hobbit.   Eating five balanced meals a day ensures that the body uses calories as fuel instead of storing it as fat, says Kaiser. Your most important snack is at 3 p.m. Try noshing on an apple with almond butter or hummus with vegetables — these contain protein, which will curb hunger before dinner. READ MORE: 9 healthy eating habits that can change your life

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Exercise-Averse

My fitness personality is... Broad City’s Ilana is my fitness kindred spirit.   If you’re as averse to exercise as Ilana is to the Upper East Side, it’s time to change. We don’t want to sound like your mom, but getting the heart pumping pretty much guarantees you’ll live longer.   READ MORE: Motivational fitness gear to inspire your workout

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Exercise-Averse

Your new rules: Keep it short and sweet. Like a good Snapchat video, workouts don’t need to be long — especially if you’re a beginner. In fact, 10-minute sessions may burn more calories than dogging it for 30 minutes, says Kaiser. Why? If you know you only have to work out for a short time, you’re likely to push yourself harder.   READ MORE: Why you don’t need to spend two hours a day at the gym

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Exercise-Averse

Your new rules: You don’t need to go to a gym.   If intervals aren’t your jam, try light cardio — from walking to swimming — twice weekly; it’s less demanding on the body. Our pick: Turn up the TLC and bust out your Rollerblades; this ’90s workout trend is making a comeback. We also love workouts that don’t feel like workouts, like adult obstacle courses. Try Pursuit OCR in Toronto; for $20, you can indulge your inner Indiana Jones. (Fedora optional.)   READ MORE: 3 health hacks for when it's cold AF and you don't want to move

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty

We decode your best summer-workout plan

Starting point: Exercise-Averse

Meal plan: Cut back just a bit.   We don’t expect you to live without a boozy brunch every now and then. In fact, eliminating indulgences may cause cravings. Registered dietitian Andrea Miller recommends making small changes to eating habits, such as putting less cream and sugar in coffee or only having a tipple if you’re tempted.   READ MORE: How I changed after a month without sugar, wheat, dairy and alcohol

Image by: ELLE Canada By: Carli Whitwell Source: Getty
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Health & Fitness

We decode your best summer-workout plan